Airplanes 🛩 / Helis/ other Aircraft Thread/ Show and Tell


#1

While I’m all fired up about threads concerning things with engines, I’ll start one about my all time favorite. This is it though, there’s already a kickin space thread.

Do you fly or just love airplanes? Heli’s? Weight shift? Powered para? Ultralights? Warbirds? Commercial pilot, what equipment you on? Fly a frog jet? Doesn’t matter. Own a fast ride or dream of one when moon?

Always dreamed of flying, but never thought you could, talk about it here. It’s a great time to get involved. Is that your “when moon” plan? (I recognize that I am in the U.S., and not all countries have easy to access airspace, but tell your story anyway.)

Cheers! :grinning:


#2

As for me, I am a US Private Pilot. Wasn’t the easiest or quickest journey to get there, but well worht the time and effort. Every takeoff and most landings are lol.

As for me, my dream plane right now is the Just SuperSTOL. But I’m a bit of a “bush” pilot at heart.

SuperSTOL


#3

These come in my inbox every week:


#4

Thats fantastic.
Love the cartoons,
Always been a small plane fan.
The old war birds especially!
Thanks for the colourful topic!
:chipmunk::chipmunk:


#5

Thanks @Pahini!

I’ve been an aviation enthusiast for, well as long as humanly possible. Always wanted to fly, but spent most of my life thinking I couldn’t. I eventually took the plunge, achieved the first goal of being licensed, and have had many great opportunities and experiences along the way.

I just try to share it with others when I can, and hopefully inspire others who may be interested to pursue it.


#6

Is learning to fly a helicopter :helicopter: part of your “when moon” plan? It is for me.

Think it’s too hard (it’s not, just different), or you have to go in the military to do it? (Although that is a very good option.)

Here’s one pilot’s well written journey:

Yes, it is expensive, about 3X the cost of a fixed wing license here in the US. But hey, “when moon” dreams right?


#8

Not the cheapest course in the world… But a pretty great way for all the “crypto rich” aviation enthusiasts to get flight experience fast.


#9

What a wonderful place to get your pilots license.
Might have to rehash my bucket list .!
:chipmunk::chipmunk:


#10

Yea definitely, if anyone’s goal is commercial aviation, it’s a great time to get into it with the “pilot shortage.” I use "s, but it is true. I’m aware of multiple regional airlines in the US cancelling flights due to not having an air crew, some small ops even going under. Regionals finally increased starting pay across the board, with air wisconsin ($70k+/yr) being one of the best. IMO, they had to after the FAA enforced the 1500hr rule. Getting six figures in debt for all your training and flight time to then make $25k/yr wasn’t happening. Majors are starting their own ab initio training.

The airplane pilot shortage has prompted the major airlines to start going after military helicopter pilots which typically fed the commercial civilian helicopter world. This had led to a pilot shortage in helicopters as well. Some companies are having to lower their time requirements to get them.

Lastly, these planes wouldn’t be flying without mechanics (A&Ps). Yep, you guessed it, there’s also a shortage of them. The industry is aware and putting programs into place for youth to gain more interest. In the US at least, being mechanically inclined with a large automotive/motorsport/ other industry background isn’t enough. You need to either go to school for typically 2 years or apprentice in a shop for 3 years (with documentation) to take you license practicals. (I would very much like to get an A&P as well :grinning:)

I am aware of some schools being condensed down to 18 months. When I was in Bethel, AK over the summer, a fueler told me about U of A Fairbanks having a 12 month course but I haven’t looked into it.

Wow, that was a lot of info but I figured I’d post it for anyone who is interested in a career change. Maybe a portion of ETN will help you follow your dreams. :grin:


#11

Absolutely, hardest part of that would be instrument training, ya know when you’re not allowed to look outside lol.

That would be quite an experience. I’ve also travelled to different locales for training, different aircraft and scenery.

Information for all interested: I personally believe it’s best to get training done as soon as possible, but a word of caution about accelerated programs covering multiple ratings. The courses and flight time are rigidly structured and your written/ practical tests are sheduled from day 1, whether you’re ready for em or not. I recommend a fair amount of book/video/ground study to be ahead of the power curve (pilot joke :wink:) before starting one.


#12

To add some contrast to the Escobar Super Cub that’s on another thread, here’s an Alaska State Trooper that dropped in on us a few years ago.


#13

Throw me a line if you’re interested in Avionics. :slight_smile:

I think the general sentiment among newcomers to aviation is that as more time passes, more automation will take place, and pilots will be valued less over time. Could be a factor. It’s certainly a pity, and I think we’re going to need pilots a lot longer than many assume!


#14

I am very interested in avionics! Although, i don’t have an ownership stake at this stage so everything I fly for the time being is either rented or “company.” No say in avionics decisions at the moment. But most have at least a G430, with 2 using old 296s.

That being said, most of my flying for the last couple years has been supplemented with an iPad mini, ads-b receiver and moving map apps. When geo-referenced approach plates came out, it was :star_struck: :heart_eyes::sunglasses:. Had an ifly700 before selling my soul to Apple.

Is Transport Canada following along with the FAAs push for the next gen airspace system in 2020? Haven’t seen much about it.

Alaska had the Capstone system for years before they called it Nextgen down here. It is nice to look at a moving map and see all the commercial aircraft operating in the area, but I don’t like seeing a lot of the legacy navaids disappearing.


#15

I think you’re correct about that. It is cool where UAS is going and what it can be used for, but scary all at the same time. Big cities will be the first to adopt more automation of most things including aerial transport. More “rural” areas are very hesitant. The technology already exists, as an airbus can land itself without pilot input. Not sure what it does after touchdown… There is a push to kick out the FO in some ops and go to single pilot only due to automation. I get the business side of it as you would effectively cut the demand in half. Fact is early automation already cut crew requirements by 1/3 with the over 2 engine turboprop and jet airliners when they got rid of the flight engineer. 727 may have been the last to have one, but don’t quote me on that.

Many in the airline business say it’s not going to happen for a long time for multiple reasons, whether single pilot or full “Otto”. At the end of the day, it’s really hard to replace gut intuition and seat of the pants feel with sensors and programming. I’m not ready to hop on an “Otto” liner anytime soon.

image


#16

Not to mention most passengers would not be comfortable whatsoever knowing there is nobody in the cockpit, haha. Of course, while you could have the occasional drunk pilot, you’re never going to have a pilot who short circuits or has a software spasm due to an unlucky glitch, solar flare, or what have you. That said I get the sentiment.
I’m not really “in the know” regarding your question about Transport Canada and Nextgen system. I’m Military, not Civilian side, so different area of focus I guess… And as counter-intuitive as it may seem, everything moves far slower on the Military side. When I step into a glass cockpit that alone makes me cry with tears of excitement. :joy:


#17

Behold the I.F.O…the Identified Flying Object


#18


#19

For our reading pleasure, some articles on blockchain’s early development into the aviation industry:

https://www.lufthansa-industry-solutions.com/de-en/solutions-products/aviation/generating-more-transparency-in-aviation-with-blockchain-technology/

https://www.accenture.com/us-en/insight-potential-blockchain-technology-for-airlines

And then this whitepaper from the International Air Transport Association (IATA), it’s a long one:


#20

Perspectives